Tag Archives: eyecare

FDA Approves Latisse for the Treatment of Hypotrichosis of the Eyelashes

It’s official, as we reported a little over 2 weeks ago about pending approval of LATISSE(TM) to increase the length, number and darkness of a patient’s eyelashes Allergan made the announcement today that the FDA approved LATISSE(TM) (bimatoprost ophthalmic solution 0.03%), allowing it to be prescribed by doctors.

Available only through a doctor, LATISSE(TM) is a once-daily prescription treatment applied to the base of the upper eyelashes with a sterile, single-use-per-eye disposable applicator. LATISSE(TM) users can expect to experience longer, fuller and darker eyelashes in as little as eight weeks, with full results in 16 weeks. To maintain effect, continued treatment with LATISSE(TM) is required. If use of LATISSE(TM) is discontinued, eyelashes will gradually return to where they were prior to treatment over a period of weeks to months (average eyelash hair cycle).

LATISSE(TM) will be available in the United States by prescription only and is subject to all U.S. guidelines applicable to dispensing a prescription product. Based on today’s FDA approval, Allergan expects to launch the product nationwide in the first quarter of 2009.

In studies LATISSE(TM) was well tolerated with the most commonly reported adverse events being non-serious and cosmetic in nature. Common adverse events observed in the clinical trial included eye redness (3.6%), itchy eyes (3.6%) and skin hyperpigmentation (2.9%).  LATISSE(TM) use may cause darkening of the eyelid skin which may be reversible. Although not reported in clinical studies, LATISSE(TM) use may also cause increased brown pigmentation of the colored part of the eye which is likely to be permanent.

Maintain Healthy Vision With Annual Eye Exams

Annual eye exams are an essential part of a person’s annual health plan.  Along with our yearly physical and dental exam we should remember that our eyes provide a window to the health of our bodies and an annual, dilated eye exam is an essential component of preventative healthcare.

See our video below which was produced at our new Colleyville office on the importance of regular eye exams.

Dr. Diana Driscoll Speaks at the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation Meeting

Dr. Diana Driscoll spoke to doctors and patients at the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation Meeting (EDNF) in Houston, Texas August 1st and 2nd.  Her topic was Your Eyes and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.  Dr. Driscoll, herself is an Ehlers-Danlos Patient, therefore her lecture extended beyond the ocular effects of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) and included some of the treatments and techniques that she has found to have increased her functionality.

The National EDNF Meeting is held every other year and is presented as an opportunity for patients with EDS, doctors and researchers to unite in their quest for answers to this debilitating condition.

Ehlers-Danlos affects multiple body systems requiring a multidisciplinary team of doctors to assist patients.  Physicians of many specialties were present as speakers, patients and attendees.

About Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is an inherited connective tissue disorder affecting our body’s production of collagen used to make connective tissue.   Connective tissue is the glue that holds our body together making up approximately 80% of our body weight.  The most common symptoms of EDS affect the joints and skin.

Skin symptoms are characterized by thin, soft, velvety skin that bruises easily and stretches.  Tearing of the skin is common along with slow wound healing.  Scars are often look like “cigarette paper”.

Joint symptoms include hyperextensible joints (joints that extend beyond their normal range of motion). People with hyperextensible joints have often been called “double jointed”.  Because the ligaments and tendons are “stretchy” the joints dislocate or become subluxated easily.  The premature onset of osteoarthritis is common and is often difficult to identify in an X-ray.

Some of the more common ocular symptoms of EDS are keratoconus, angioid streaks, and myopia.  EDS patients are not candidates for LASIK.  At Total Eye Care we are keenly aware of the potential complication that can result from any corneal surgeries performed on Ehlers-Danlos patients.

One of the most debilitating complications of EDS is a type of dysautonomia called Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome or POTS.  Dysautonomia is the result of our autonomic nervous system ceasing to function properly.  Our autonomic nervous system regulates functions that our body does automatically such as digestion, breathing, heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, blood sugar regulation, hormonal/endocrine imbalances and our  sleep cycle.

Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia causes a person’s heart to race when they stand still.  When a normal person stands, their heart rate may go up a few beats per minute and stabilize. A POTS patient’s heart rate will go up over 30 beats per minute.  If their body can not compensate, a POTS patient will often faint or shake uncontrollably.  A tilt table is used to test for POTS.

It is estimated that 40% to 70% of EDS patients suffer from POTS.  Many patients with POTS don’t know that they have EDS and are often mis-diagnosed with fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome.  It is thought that autonomic dysfunction is caused by instability of the cervical spine thus interfering with the brain stem’s ability to regulate our bodies.

The classification system for Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome consists of 6 types; Classical, Hypermobile, Vascular, Kyphoscoliosis, Arthrochalasia, Dermatosparaxis.  The prevalence of EDS is approximately 1 in 3000.  EDS affects both males and females and is not specific regarding race or ethnicity.

Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is a genetic disorder, however many patients, such as Dr. Driscoll, are unaffected until the symptoms are triggered by a virus.

An updated version of Your Eyes and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is now available, with color photos, on Amazon.com as a downloadable eBook.

This entry has been cross posted on The Total Eye Care Website.

Q: “When should my child have her first eye exam?”

A:

Your baby should have her eyes examined at any age if a

problem is suspected. Until recently eye exams were recommended for all children before they entered kindergarten. However, numerous national organizations such as the American Optometric Association, American Academy of Ophthalmology and Prevent Blindness America have begun to recommend that your child receive their first eye exam at 6 months of age and then again at 3 years of age. Many forms of blindness or amblyopia (a decrease in vision) that occur in children can be prevented if caught early. Before you take your child to your eye doctor ask them if they are set up to evaluate children that are your child’s age. Not all eye doctors see young children.