Summer – A Great Time for Orthokeratology

I was asked what is the 60 second brief on OrthoK so here are my high points along with a video. 

Orthokeratology – or·tho·kera·tol·o·gy – a treatment for improving vision by altering the shape of the cornea through the application of corneal molds that are worn while you sleep.

Adult patients, kids, and parents alike express amazement at how we can alter or mold the shape of the cornea with a contact lens, resulting in clear vision during the day without the need for glasses. It’s not magic, the science is very well established and FDA approved.  We remold the cornea like what is done in LASIK. The difference is that Ortho-K achieves this without the use of a laser, it is reversible, and it is easily modifiable.

Check out the video below and see what patients are saying about Orthokeratology. If you want to know more about Orthokeratology call our office for a free consultation 817.416.0333 or visit www.OrthoKDoctor.com

 

What Does Pink Eye or Red Eye Mean?

Red eye PhotoPink eye is a descriptive term indicating that the eye is inflamed for some reason. Not all pink eyes are infected or contagious. “Pink” eye is usually caused by a virus (often quite contagious), allergies, or bacteria. The most common cause of pink eye is a viral infection or allergies. Patients with pink eye should not wear contact lenses. Read more…..

New Drug For Dry Eye Treatment

Bausch & Lomb announced it has acquired the rights to market a new medication for the treatment of dry eye syndrome. This, yet to be named, medication will improve the quality of tears by promoting the eye’s ability to produce mucin, an essential component of our tears, that is responsible for prolonging the evaporation time.

This medication will be the first of it’s class and the first to focus on improving tear quality instead of quantity. Dosing will be twice a day. Phase 3 clinical trials are to begin by the end of 2013.

While a few years from clinical use this compound will provide a new approach to the treatment of dry eye syndrome..

Study Shows Orthokeratology Effective in Reducing the Progression of Nearsightedness in Children

The study of myopia control (nearsightedness) is a hot field of study, particularly in China where the High Myopia – Partial Reduction Orthokeratology (HM-PRO) study was conducted. This study is the latest in an effort to find an effective means to slow or even stop the progression of nearsightedness in children. The HM-PRO study is unique in that it treated 18 highly myopic children (Rx over -5.75 D) between the ages of 8 and 11 with a combination of OrthoK lenses and glasses, and followed them for two years. The study participants were matched with a control group of 18 children, the same age and also with prescriptions over -5.75D.

In the HM-PRO study 18 participants and 18 control patients were followed for 2 years. 15 of the treatment patients and 13 control patients completed the study.  After two years the treated patient’s nearsightedness increased by – 0.13D and the untreated (control) patients increased their nearsightedness by -1.00D.

Myopic progression is also measured by how much the eye grows in length (called the axial length). In this case the treated patients showed a significant reduction in progression with their axial length increasing by 0.19 mm whereas the control group’s axial length increased by 0.51 mm.

The study authors concluded that orthokeratology lenses slowed axial length elongation by 63% and reduced the prescription change by 87%. It has yet to be shown that orthokeratology lenses stop the myopic progression clearly this study, like numerous other before it, show that orthokeratology is effective in markedly slowing the progression of nearsightedness in children. At Total Eye Care we have been using reverse curve orthokeratology lenses to control myopia since 1999 and have fit hundreds of kids and adults.

The Harlem Shake Total Eye Care Style

See how Total Eye Care does lunch.

Scleral Lenses – An Old Dog With New Tricks

Eye with keratoconusScleral lenses have been around for over 100 years. Until the new gas permeable lens materials were developed patients could only wear scleral lenses for a few hours a day. With the highly oxygen permeable lens materials now in use, patients can comfortably wear these lenses all day. Scleral lenses are most commonly used to treat eyes with irregular corneas such as keratoconus and post surgical eyes (usually following corneal transplant surgery or related to complications from refractive surgery). Another common use for scleral lenses is in the special effects industry where they are used to protect the cornea and/or to give the eye an exotic appearance.

What Is A Scleral Lens?

Scleral lenses are large contact lenses that rest on the sclera (white part of the eye) with the remainder of the lens vaulting over the cornea. Tears are trapped between the lens and the cornea allowing sclerals to treat irregular corneas. The average soft contact lens has a diameter of about 14 mm whereas scleral lenses typically have a diameter exceeding 14.5 mm. 

How Are Scleral Lenses used?

At Total Eye Care Dr. Driscoll has  used scleral lenses to treat many conditions such as irregular astigmatism, keratoconus, high myopia, dry eye syndrome, and complications related to LASIK and PRK. Because of their size, sclerals are quite comfortable. Patients often report the comfort being similar to that of a soft contact lens. Most patients with irregular corneas will see better with a scleral lens than with glasses. 

Below is a good video that shows how scleral lenses are cared for and how to insert and remove them.

Computer Glasses – What Are They, How Will They Help, Are They Worth it?

Computer glasses are an under used component of a comfortable office environment. As a person approaches their 50’s it becomes more difficult to see things not only at near but at an intermediate range as well. Normal progressive lenses let you see objects clearly at this distance but only by lifting your head up to look through the intermediate portion of the glasses. Using regular glasses while working at the computer leads to neck pain, back pain and eye strain. This is where computer glasses come in.

Progressive lenses allow a person over 40 to view objects clearly at all distances, even computer distance. Progressive lenses let us view intermediate objects by looking half way down the lens. With computer glasses; however, you can view an intermediate object by looking straight ahead (most computer monitors are at eye level), and the bottom of the computer lens lets you focus an object at normal reading distance. Computer glasses allow for a natural eye position so you can comfortably view your computer.

If your computer monitor is at eye level, you are in your late forties or older, and spend more than 30 minutes at the computer a day then computer glasses are definitely a worthwhile investment.

Computer glasses are an important part of making your workstation a comfortable place to work. See this article on visual ergonomics for more information on setting up your workstation.

FDA Approves First Bionic Eye

The FDA approved Second Sight’s “bionic” eye. While actually more of a retinal prosthesis, the implant is designed to assist patients with retinitis pigmentosa. The Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System has a resolution of 60 pixels. The device will not provide the HD type of vision that our eyes are capable of; however, more importantly, this technology will greatly aid a blind patient’s mobility and is a revolutionary step forward.

The system consists of a wireless retinal implant that rests on the retina. The patient will wear special glasses that see the image. The image will be sent to a visual processing unit that is worn on the patient’s hip. Once the data is processed it is sent back to the glasses which wirelessly transmit this data to the retinal implant. The implant electrically stimulates the photoreceptors simulating a coarse image. The patient learns how to interpret these light and dark images allowing them to navigate around and among obstacles.

The device was approved for use in Europe last year. Check out the video below from the European branch of the medical device company.

Say It With Your Eyes This Valentine’s Day

Some say the eyes are the window to your soul, but did you know they are also a window to your overall health?  Signs of high blood pressure and other conditions which can indicate an increased risk of heart disease and stroke can be seen with an eye exam.

 As February is American Heart Month, Drs. Richard Driscoll and Alycia Green of Total Eye Care are encouraging residents of Keller and Colleyville to take this opportunity to protect their vision and heart health by having an eye exam and an optomap retinal exam.

Dr. Driscoll comments: “Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States; one in every three deaths is from heart disease and stroke, equal to 2,200 deaths per day.”*

Most people don’t realize that by visiting their optometrist for an eye examination, and in particular by having a simple optomap,  signs of hypertension can be detected, which if left untreated, can lead to heart problems and stroke.

An optomap is one of the most advanced technologies in eye care technology. It is the only technology currently available that provides an ultra-wide 82% view of the retina (the back of the eye) in one image – including the all-important periphery for successful diagnostics of both eye and non-eye related conditions and diseases.

“Viewing the retina during an eye examination allows  me to see the retinal blood vessels and detect any changes to their size and pattern,” Says Dr. Green. “Such changes can be indicative of changes in blood vessels in other parts of the body, such as the heart, and they highlight that further medical investigation and treatment may be required.”

To book an eye examination and optomap call 817.416.0333 or schedule an appointment online.

For more details on American Heart Month 2013 and further information about heart disease visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – www.cdc.gov/features/heartmonth/

* Source: www.cdc.gov/features/heartmonth/ (online, 2013)

Leading Causes of Contact Lens Discomfort are . . .

I came across some good information from our friends at Bausch & Lomb on the common causes of contact lens discomfort (used with permission). Soft contact lenses are generally very comfortable. When contact lens discomfort occurs it can usually be easily remedied.

What Causes Contact Lens Discomfort?

inserting a soft contact lensContact lens discomfort can occur for a variety of reasons. In order for contact lenses to work the way they’re supposed to, it’s important to care for them properly, following the maintenance and replacement schedule. These guidelines help to keep your eyes healthy and comfortable in contact lenses. If they’re not followed, problems with vision, comfort and other safety issues can occur.

You should be aware that the following problems may occur:

  • Eyes stinging, burning, itching (irritation), or other eye pain
  • Comfort is less than when lens was first placed on eye
  • Abnormal feeling of something in the eye (foreign body, scratched area)
  • Excessive watering (tearing) of the eyes
  • Unusual eye secretions
  • Redness of the eyes
  • Reduced sharpness of vision (poor visual acuity)
  • Blurred vision, rainbows, or halos around objects
  • Sensitivity to light (photophobia)
  • Dry eyes

If you notice any of the above symptoms:

Immediately remove your lenses.

If the discomfort or problem stops, then look closely at the lens. If the lens is damaged in any way, do not put the lens back on your eye. Place the lens in the storage case and contact your eye care professional. If the lens has dirt, an eyelash, or other foreign body on it, or the problem stops and the lens appears undamaged, you should thoroughly clean, rinse, and disinfect the lenses; then reinsert them. After reinsertion, if the problem continues, you should immediately remove the lenses and consult your eye care professional.

When any of the above problems occur, a serious condition such as infection, corneal ulcer, neovascularization, or iritis may be present. You should keep the lens off your eye and seek immediate professional identification of the problem and prompt treatment to avoid serious eye damage.

Be sure to follow the manufacturer’s recommendations, cleaning your lenses with each use, and replacing them on the schedule your eye care professional recommended for you. This is the best way to ensure your lenses stay comfortable and your eyes stay healthy.

Poor Fit

Your eye’s size and shape are unique to you, and your contact lenses should be too. Your eye care professional performs a variety of measurements to make sure the fit of your contact lens is well-fitting, but sometimes, it may be a little off.

Symptoms: Feeling a foreign object in the eye, slight pain or irritation, redness, fluctuations in vision

Treatment: Tell your eye care professional – they will reexamine your eyes and lens selection to give you a better fit. This is important, as improperly fit lenses may cause surface abrasions to the cornea.

Contact Lens Associated Dry Eyes

People with dry eyes may not produce enough tears to keep eyes moist and lubricated. This creates discomfort when they wear contact lenses. Dry eyes may be inherent (associated with a number of medical conditions), or acquired (linked with risk factors such as smoking, computer use, caffeine, certain medications, and more).

Symptoms: Tired eyes, dry eyes, and discomfort

Treatments: Your eye care professional may recommend a lubricating/rewetting solution for your use. Moisturize your soft contact lenses to soothe your eyes and minimize lens dryness and discomfort while wearing them with a lubricating and rewetting drop. It’s important to find a drop that’s compatible with your contact lenses.

Environmental Allergens

Your eyes may become irritated when there are large amounts of environmental allergens such as dust or dander. These allergens can stick to the surface of lenses, causing irritation for the wearer.

Symptoms: Redness, irritation, dryness

Treatments: Frequent cleaning is crucial to remove any buildup that may occur on lenses. If problems persist, switching to a daily disposable modality can provide a fresh pair of lenses every day. If it’s seasonal allergies that are affecting your eyes, be sure to remove your contact lenses before using an eye drop that isn’t specifically intended for use with contact lenses and wait 15-20 minutes before inserting your lenses.

Underlying Conditions

Irritation in your eyes may not come from your contact lenses at all. If your eyes become red, swollen, or if you experience discharge, you should contact an eye care professional immediately. Your symptoms may be a result of infection, or underlying disease and should be diagnosed and treated as soon as possible. You should not wear contact lenses if you have an eye infection or while using certain topical eye medications.

The original article can be found here.